Danny Short: Composing for theatre with Timeline and Mobius

Danny Short: Composing for theatre with Timeline and Mobius

We love to find Strymon pedals being used in interesting contexts, which is why we were pleased to hear from Danny Short who’s creative life is currently centered around musical theatre.

Danny is an extraordinarily versatile guitarist. After training at the Royal Academy of Music he carved out a career as performer (supporting Elton John) and composer with credits on numerous TV shows and theatrical productions. He has also toured in Europe, Asia, Russia and North America, including recent engagements as the Musical Director of the National Theatre of Scotland touring with David Greig’s “Dunsinane”.

More recently Danny has focused his talent on musical theatre, integrating Strymon’s Timeline and Mobius into a more dramatic musical setting than you might expect….

 

MPS
What are you working on at the moment?

DS
I am spending most of my time writing and producing original music at the moment. I have been working with some great artists who are featured on my songs. I plan to release some tunes in the autumn. Apart from that, my current gig is on High Society at the Old Vic theatre. I have been working as a pit/session musician in London for about 7 years now and had some great experiences working in different musical capacities.

MPS
What part of your musical life do you get the most satisfaction out of?

DS
My focus at the moment is writing songs, but I really enjoy working in a variety of musical contexts. Touring Asia and Russia with the National Theatre Scotland was a great experience. As the MD it was really interesting to work closely with the director/composer and gain a more holistic view on how the music fits within the context of the play as a whole. I really enjoy touring and seeing different cultures and ways of life throughout the world.

MPS
Who do you count among your musical influences?

DS
I listen to as much music as possible. I love being introduced to new music and checking out new artists. I would say my taste is pretty eclectic from charts hits to rock to EDM to jazz to classical all the way to Scottish traditional music. I try to listen to an artist’s entire catalogue, hearing their development over time.

MPS
What was your first guitar?

DS
My first guitar was a 50 quid acoustic guitar. I used it on a session recently, pretty funny.

MPS
What guitars are you playing at the moment?

DS
Still the same strat that I have had for over a decade. The guitar has done me well. I have a deal with Suhr guitars and I am thinking of having one built for me at the moment. Also, my future wife said she might buy me one...

MPS
Tell us about your Timeline and Mobius, what made you chose them?

DS
I think Strymon are leading the way in guitar pedals. The Timeline is now an industry standard. What I love about Strymon pedals is that they maintain the guitar’s original tone without too much colouring. The quality of the effects is beautiful. The Mobius is also wicked. I love the Quadrature Machine. I use both the Timeline and Mobius on my upcoming releases. I’m thinking about ordering a BigSky too, all my mates recommend them.

MPS
What else do you have on your pedalboard?

DS
Analogue Man make great pedals. I was in touch with Mike and managed to get my hands on a King of Tone which is awesome. I run all my pedal through the Gigrig G2. Maintaining the guitar’s original tone is a big thing for me and Daniel at the Gigrig has nailed it with the G2.

MPS
Is there anything you have parted with that you really miss?

DS
Not really. I try to keep all my gear. You never know when you need it. Like using my first guitar on a session the other day.

MPS
Can you think of anything that really changed things for you?

DS
The Strymon pedals have opened up a whole new sound world for me. Some pedals, like the Timeline, can trigger new musical ideas.

MPS
Is there any advice you can offer to people starting out on their musical journeys?

DS
I suppose just practice as much as possible and keep going. I know a lot of guys who have quit music because it’s not happened fast enough for them. The other thing I would say is always trust your instinct and don't intellectualise it too much, especially composing. I have been guilty of that in the past. Now I just trust my first instinct and stick with it.

To find out more about what Danny is working on, follow him on Instagram and Twitter 

 

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